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From the Wineries of Yesterday, to Today. A History of Wine Making

The history of wineries is a long and winding one, with many twists and turns. Join us as we take a look at the past to see what has shaped today’s wine industry.

Many people have an idea that the earliest wines were made by ancient civilizations. This would be false! The first evidence of wine making comes from around 8000 BC in Georgia, where the inhabitants had found out how to ferment fruit juice into something they called “honey-wine.”

The Middle East was also home to some very early wine making, as we know from artifacts found in Iran and Iraq that date back 7000 years! However, these wines would have been more like a grape juice than anything else (though still with alcoholic content).

Further north, in what is now Turkey (ancient Anatolia), people were making wine at least 7000 years ago too. What’s most interesting about these early wines was that they would have been made using the wild grapes that grew in the area, rather than ones which were cultivated.

Hundreds of years later (5500 BC), winemaking had spread to Greece and Cyprus where wines continued to be made using wild grapes – just like in Turkey. The Egyptians were also making wine at this time, though they tended to use cultivated grapes rather than wild ones – which is what most people think of when you mention “grapes”.

The Romans are probably one of the most well-known for their winemaking. To them, wine was a daily necessity. They grew grapes all over the Italian peninsula, but also in Gaul (where they are now France), Germany and Spain too – which have some of the best wines in the world today!

In fact, Roman wines were so popular that they became a sort of international currency – with the word “value” coming from the Latin vinum (wine). In addition to this, wine was also used as medicine and even food in some cases! The Romans had great winemaking techniques, but didn’t know much about yeast or oxidation.

The wine industry continued to flourish in Europe until it was halted by The Great Plague, which killed many people who would have been needed for winemaking – including those that worked the land. The industry continued to be important, but it wasn’t until the 1600s that things began to pick up again – with wine being produced in most European countries by this time!

This resurgence led to a focus on using cultivated grapes rather than wild ones – which had changed the taste of wine. A French scientist named Louis Pasteur proved that fermentation was caused by yeast, and things started to get more scientific from there on out!

The 1900s saw the rise of the wine industry in America, New Zealand and Australia. Despite this, most people still associate winemaking with France – where it has grown into a huge international business that brings billions of dollars to their economy each year!

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Tips For Starting A Wine Business

Are you interested in starting a wine business? There are many things to consider when doing so, from how much it will cost to what type of wines you’ll be selling. In this blog post, we’ll cover the basics of starting a wine business and provide information about different aspects of running one.

Every business has to start somewhere. Before you can open up shop, you have to figure out what type of wine business model you want to pursue and whether or not it’s right for your area. You also need a location where people are likely to come by regularly so that they’ll be able to purchase your wines on the regular basis. You’ll also need a plan for purchasing your wines wholesale and dealing with the logistics of having them transported from where they’re made to where you live.

In addition, it’s important that you have a good marketing strategy in place so that people know about your brand and what types of wines you offer. You’ll want to think about how often you’ll be updating your website and social media pages to ensure that people know you’re still in business, as well. You should also consider having a brick and mortar store if possible because it will help boost foot traffic and get more customers into the door.

The last thing you want to think about is pricing strategies for both wine by the bottle and wine by the glass. Finally, you’ll want to purchase any necessary licenses and permits for starting up your business in order to make sure that everything runs smoothly from start to finish.